Verschleierung und Alkoholverbote: Zunehmender Einfluss des Islamismus in Algerien

Mosques are going up, women are covering up, and shops selling alcoholic beverages are shutting down in a changing Algeria where, slowly but surely, Muslim fundamentalists are gaining ground.

The North African country won its civil war with extremists who brought Algeria to its knees in the name of Islam during the 1990s. Yet authorities show little overt concern about the growing grip of Salafis, who apply a strict brand of the Muslim faith.

Algerians favoring the trend see it as a benediction, while critics worry that the rise of Salafism, a form of Islam that interprets the Quran literally, may seep deeper into social mores and diminish the chances for a modern Algeria that values freedom of choice. (…)

Algeria’s North African neighbors also have been grappling with a new assertiveness from those seeking a greater role for Islam in society, and have folded Islamist parties into their power structures.

In Morocco, where a moderate Islamist party runs the government, women increasingly don veils, especially in working-class neighborhoods.

(Associated Press: „Fundamentalists gain ground in Algeria as war memory fades“.)

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