Irak: Diskussion um Ehe für 9-Jährige

frauenrechte_irak„Yanar Mohammed runs a secret network of safe houses in her native Iraq. The women who come through its doors are honor-killing runaways, rape survivors, war widows and assorted others who have been to the cliff edge of hell and back. The shelters are meant to give them a second chance in life. Running the shelters gave her a second chance, too. Ms. Mohammed left Iraq more than 20 years ago with her husband and their young son, and she tried for several years to settle into a life of quiet and comfort in Toronto. Exile did not settle well with her, however. ‚Have you ever been kicked out of your house?‘ she said in a recent interview. ‚Do you know what that feels like? You try one way or the other to get your place back.‘

So she did, returning in 2003 after Saddam Hussein was toppled and finding herself at the center of the storm that set back the lives of Iraqi women in ways she could hardly have imagined. (…) Today, in Iraq, Shariah law is enforced, and so-called honor killings are rarely punished. So intensely has sectarian hatred seeped into the hearts of her compatriots, she says, that neighbors enslave one another’s daughters in the badlands controlled by the Islamic State, including in her father’s native city, Tal Afar. ‚The steps backward cannot be counted,‘ she said. ‚There were too many.‘ (…) ‚For me, the Islamist groups on the ground are like the Ku Klux Klan in the U.S., or the Nazis in Germany,‘ she said on the phone from Toronto this week. She cited the efforts of conservatives – so far unsuccessful – to legalize child marriage. ‚In Iraq, they wanted to legalize marriage for 9-year-old girls,‘ she said. ‚How can we live with that?‘“ (Somini Sengupta: „Finding a Path Back to Iraq, and Toward Securing Women’s Freedom“)

 

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